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 Post subject: 2005 Ducati 1000 engine?
PostPosted: January 30, 2015, 2:14 pm 
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Location: No. Nevada
Have the chance to grab a low mileage Ducati S4r "Monster" 1000 cc for about $500.

A little smaller than ideal but local and supposed to be complete.
A twin so it should have decent torque and sound good.
It's also NOT Japanese, which I like.

I think these are chain drive so I would have to turn it sideways for my use since the engine has to be REAR mounted.
That is dictated by the Tatum body design, but the Duc. should be lighter and give better balance than the original VW flat four.

My main concern is dealing with the oiling system.
Attempts at learning more about these engines have been frustrating, Web searches just give me offers to sell a bike or old reviews.

Anyone here have a Duc. engine in their car, or even experience with them as bikes?
What do I need to look out for when looking at the engine?
Major issues for BEC use?
Fixes?

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PostPosted: January 30, 2015, 2:33 pm 
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Found this, looking pretty good so far.

A little down on power compared to some of the big jap bikes but these cars were quick with mere VW engines.
Car will need to be light!

Model: Ducati Monster S4R
Year: 2005

Engine and transmission
Displacement: 996.00 ccm (60.78 cubic inches)
Engine type: Twin, four-stroke
Power: 115.46 HP (84.3 kW)) @ 9500 RPM
Torque: 101.00 Nm (10.3 kgf-m or 74.5 ft.lbs) @ 7000 RPM
Compression: 11.6:1
Bore x stroke: 98.0 x 66.0 mm (3.9 x 2.6 inches)
Valves per cylinder: 4
Fuel system: Injection. Marelli electronic fuel injection, 50 mm throttle body
Cooling system: Liquid
Gearbox: 6-speed
Transmission type,
final drive: Chain
Clutch: Dry multiplate with hydraulic control

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PostPosted: January 30, 2015, 3:05 pm 
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Location: Garner NC
You'll want to see a dyno sheet to see what the torque curve looks like. Also, see if you can find the gear ratios.

With those together, along with your tire height and final drive ratio, you can take a look at the available HP at various speeds in each gear. That will be a good indicator of what it will be like driving the car.

If the motor is making good power at the bottom of each gear change, and not falling off at the top, it will be a fun car to drive.


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PostPosted: January 30, 2015, 4:23 pm 
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RichardSIA wrote:
Major issues for BEC use?


They need fairly frequent valve adjustments (every ~7000 miles IIRC) which you're going to want to learn to do for yourself because it'll cost north of a grand to have it done for you.


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PostPosted: January 30, 2015, 4:53 pm 
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Engines make power two ways, either through displacement and/or rpm (I'm leaving FI out). Bike engines take the latter path so it's hard to just cruise, so yes, agreed that it's good to look at the dyno chart. The potential problem is where that power and torque is. Having to rev the engine to 9000+ rpm every time can get a little annoying. I recommend the largest displacement bike engine you can get if you want anything close to car-like functionality.

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PostPosted: February 1, 2015, 3:46 pm 
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Location: Portland Oregon
Concern for me would be the clutch. The 1000 cc if I recollect is a dry clutch anf they are not the most robust piece. Other is the "snatchy - ness" of a Vee twin. Just my opinion.
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PostPosted: March 20, 2015, 5:46 pm 
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Joined: February 20, 2015, 12:04 pm
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Location: Cotswolds - UK
KB58 wrote:
Having to rev the engine to 9000+ rpm every time can get a little annoying.

Although a vee twin at 9,000 rpm is only making as many bangs per minute as a 4 cylinder engine at 4,500rpm. ;)



The Spartan started out life with a Ducati vee twin, but they changed to a Honda car engine, due to reliability issues... you might perhaps try e-mailing them to see if they're willing to share their knowledge?


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PostPosted: March 22, 2015, 12:49 am 
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Seller did not have the complete wiring with computer so I passed on it.

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PostPosted: April 19, 2016, 3:38 pm 
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You will be happy you passed on it. Ducati's tend to pound the clutch basket to death. The downside of lots of torque and a dry clutch set up.

Clutches and steals are cheap, that basket not so much.

Look at a ST4 or a newer bikes (898 Monster, 1199 have wet clutches as well).

If you are anti-Japanese, you might want to consider a Moto Guzzi as well, although they are air cooled.

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PostPosted: April 21, 2016, 9:28 pm 
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LOVE the Ducati engine for riding. Tool around at 3 grand or scream it over 10,000RPMs. But the valve adjustments will kill you. Desmodromic (no spring) valve actuation means 2 adjustments per valve. One opening, one closing. With 4 valves per, that much action going on means it is stupendously fiddly to get right, and valve adjustments for that era were ~6000 mile intervals. Might be higher now, but that is about right for my bike.

ST4 was dry clutch too. I don't know if any recent Ducatis are wet clutch, but my ST4 is definitely dry.

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PostPosted: April 22, 2016, 7:54 am 
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According to what I can find the ST4 went to a wet clutch around 2005. When Ducati tried to make it more touring oriented,( and eliminate a complaint area).

As far as the valve adjustments, the intervals are a pain (which can be practically doubled with the use of square instead of round collets) but as far as the actual adjust they aren't bad after you have done them a few times. What I always have despised is you have to adjust them by replacing the collets. So if you don't have one, you have to order them and wait. Which is a pain.

I loved my Cagiva Gran Canyon but I loathed the bucket of rocks dry clutch. I get some people think it is the greatest of sounds in the world but to me it is a sign of a poor mechanical design. Honestly I always asked myself if people who liked the sound of the dry clutch secretly thought that gravel in a cement mixer was a soothing sound.

The sound of the Desmo engine running from about 3000 up to redline, on the other hand, is a symphony trumpets that no other engine can produce. I can overlook everything else for that.

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PostPosted: April 22, 2016, 10:06 pm 
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Funny, I thought they killed off the ST4 by then and went to the ST3. But as for making it more of a tourer, I don't get it. I went to StJohns Newfoundland and down to NewOrleans on that bike. Two-upped along Skyline Drive. 800 mile days from Florida to N. Carolina. How much more touring do you need? A stereo?

Never cared one way or another about the clutch, but the way she picked up when spanked? Oh yeah. I passed a partner in my consulting firm who was impressed with his M3. Passed him on one wheel in about 50 ft, with his foot all the way through the throttle body. That bike is the bomb.

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PostPosted: June 7, 2016, 6:43 pm 
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FWIW Ducati doesn't use dry clutches anymore, and the valve service interval is up to 18,000 miles on some models.

So if you have a bit of cash for a newer bike/engine you can now get twins with up to 200hp and decent service intervals.

The electronics will likely drive you nuts during the install, but the payoff...


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