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Learning how to build Lotus Seven replicas...together!
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2011 3:19 pm 
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This trike may be a bit too low powered for this forum, but you have been a big inspiration for the project, so I thought I'd bite the bullet and share it here, now that it is finally starting to look like something.

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More pics and details: http://nathanielhill.com/


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2011 4:52 pm 
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Yo, Nate-
Love the jackstands! Did you have the soup for lunch before they became jackstands? Definitely "Lo Cost"!!! :rofl:

:cheers:

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JD, father of Quinn, Son of a... Build Log
Quinn the Slotus:Ford 302 Powered, Mallock-Inspired, Tube Frame, Hillclimb Special
"Gonzo and friends: Last night must have been quite a night. Camelot moments, mechanical marvels, Rustoleum launches, flying squirrels, fru-fru tea cuppers, V8 envy, Ensure catch cans -- and it wasn't even a full moon." -- SeattleTom


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2011 5:46 pm 
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Neat!

I'm curious, will you be supporting the BMX wheels on both sides of the hub or just the inside? I sense a lot of snappy snappy if you only mount them on one side...


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2011 9:32 pm 
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Thanks Gonzo. Those beans will be my victory meal upon completion of the ride. Nice car you're building by the way, I spent a good half hour looking through your thread.

Tom, as of now, I am only supporting them on one side. Over at atomiczombie.com, they do this on 500lb trikes, so I think it may work, but I am prepared for failure. If it fails, I can always just put something else on.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 12, 2011 11:17 am 
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I can't see any details on their site. Do they use hubs with beefed up axles for single sided mounting, or are they using normal bike axles just mounted on one side?

I'm very curious about this as I may well end up making small projects like that with my son. I just can't see those skinny standard axles holding up... Looking forward to see how it goes for you :)


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 12, 2011 11:33 am 
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Hey Nate-
Thanks for the compliments... My build's a "work in progress", I do hope to make a car one day. I appreciate the encouragement! :cheers:

BTW, we have some truly "Lo Cost" jackstands at Slotus Engineering Headquarters. They're real jackstands, but we stole 'em from Mikey's shop! Only downside is, there's no beans...

Good luck with your build, keep us posted!

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JD, father of Quinn, Son of a... Build Log
Quinn the Slotus:Ford 302 Powered, Mallock-Inspired, Tube Frame, Hillclimb Special
"Gonzo and friends: Last night must have been quite a night. Camelot moments, mechanical marvels, Rustoleum launches, flying squirrels, fru-fru tea cuppers, V8 envy, Ensure catch cans -- and it wasn't even a full moon." -- SeattleTom


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 12, 2011 2:03 pm 
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Tom17 wrote:
I can't see any details on their site. Do they use hubs with beefed up axles for single sided mounting, or are they using normal bike axles just mounted on one side?

I'm very curious about this as I may well end up making small projects like that with my son. I just can't see those skinny standard axles holding up... Looking forward to see how it goes for you :)


The axles are generally 14mm, although they sometimes go up to 20mm, but that requires custom building wheels with mountain bike hubs and bmx rims. Mine are factory built wheels with 14mm axles, which are larger and stronger than the 10mm axles found on your average bike with bolt on axles. You can find these wheels for sale alongside those with standard axles. Generally, the rims and spokes seem to be the weakest link, which is why most trike builders who use bike wheels won't go above 20" (bmx) wheels.

The axles that came with the wheels are hollow though, and I had a bit of an issue with them seizing in the "kingpin" piece I made before I could thread them in all the way, so as I said, a failure would not surprise me, but it would not be due to the size of the axle, rather the failures of the builder. If this should happen, It will be pretty easy to replace the old axle with a hardened 14mm threaded rod and a better made kingpin.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 12, 2011 2:35 pm 
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Interesting stuff, thanks :)

Tom...


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2011 2:29 am 
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what keeps the whole front a-arm from sliding forward?


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2011 2:51 am 
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The A-arm is held in by screws in the pillow block bearings. It is also made to slide into the arms rather than fall off in case of a failure when braking.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2011 10:11 am 
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Why not use Heim joints? They'd be smaller, lighter and a better application for the forces involved.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2011 2:18 pm 
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JonW wrote:
Why not use Heim joints? They'd be smaller, lighter and a better application for the forces involved.

When researching, the only ones I found were very small and about twice as expensive. They certainly look like a better option now, but the majority of this build has been done with no background knowledge whatsoever, which tends to lead to compromises.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2011 10:33 pm 
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Updated website, I'm not sure what protocol is here, but I assume it's copying and pasting. Someone let me know.

I finally got my rear tire today, from a very nice man who said he had never heard of a project like this in his 25 years of working on cars. It is a 205/45/17, with an outside diameter of about 24.25" and a total weight of 33.4 lbs for the wheel plus tire. This means I can finally begin work on the trailing arm, as well as the rear wheel skirt and the chain drive.

Image

I already began working on other things this week, completing the long overdue tasks of building a "hood" and mounting the windshield, which is also the door. You will notice that I also have my first section of body in. Sadly, that is what will be covering the entire car. It is about 31 gauge galvanized steel, which comes in 20" x 25' rolls for roofing. I know it looks ugly, but I was not willing to pay for and work with fiberglass.

Image

Contrary to what I had read, my Harbor Freight flux welder was able to weld the 31 gauge steel, however it was a difficult and slow task with mediocre looking results, so I decided to simply screw the body on. Here is the welder with the lid cut off and a 10 lb spool mounted in place of the standard 1-2 lb. Amazingly, it still works fine.

Image

I suddenly have numerous things to work on, enough to keep me very busy in the coming days. More updates to come.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2011 10:39 pm 
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Nate-
Do NOT weld that galvanized steel! It gives of fumes (I forget exactly what kind) that are mucho bad for you, as in carcinogens. Do a quick Google search, and I'm sure you can find out details. It's been discussed in here as well, but Google will be quicker.

I see where you decided to rivet/screw the panels to the frame, and that's a good thing...

:cheers:
JD


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2011 10:59 pm 
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JD. Where did you get that info?

I did exactly as you suggested and googled welding galvanized steel and added OSHA. This is what I found this at http://www.osha.gov/doc/outreachtraining/htmlfiles/weldhlth.html:

Quote:
ZINC

Zinc is used in large quantities in the manufacture of brass, galvanized metals, and various other alloys. Inhalation of zinc oxide fumes can occur when welding or cutting on zinc-coated metals. Exposure to these fumes is known to cause metal fume fever. Symptoms of metal fume fever are very similar to those of common influenza. They include fever (rarely exceeding 102o F), chills, nausea, dryness of the throat, cough, fatigue, and general weakness and aching of the head and body. The victim may sweat profusely for a few hours, after which the body temperature begins to return to normal. The symptoms of metal fume fever have rarely, if ever, lasted beyond 24 hours. The subject can then appear to be more susceptible to the onset of this condition on Mondays or on weekdays following a holiday than they are on other days.


Also from Sperkoengineering.com:
Quote:
Zinc Fumes -- A Safety Hazard?
When zinc vapor mixes with the oxygen in the air, it reacts instantly to become zinc oxide. This is the same white powder that you see on some noses at the beach and the slopes. Zinc oxide is non-toxic and non carcinogenic. Extensive research nto the effects of zinc oxide fumes has been done, and although breathing those fumes will cause welders to think that they have the flu in a bad way, there are no long-term health effects.


I have welded galvanized steel (conduit) with no short term ill effects and feel confident that my life will not be reduced by doing so. I have read that some welders are sensitive to this and others are not, so I won't make any absolute claims. I am not a welder and don't weld galvanized steel for 8hrs a day. I do open the garage doors for good ventilation.

I'm not trying to start a fight, but just trying to clear up a misconception. :cheers:

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“Any suspension will work if you don’t let it.” - Colin Chapman

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