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Learning how to build Lotus Seven replicas...together!
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PostPosted: January 19, 2007, 11:24 pm 
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Thanks,

Building the second car seems twice as productive. I can see 5 moves ahead, instead of taking two steps forward and 1 step backward after making a blunder during the first build. It also helps that I have most Fridays off. (Fathering duties ending; boys are 20 and 26 and away at school.)

The challenge will be joining the front and rear suspension subframes together with the main tubes. If my bender doesn't successfully bend the tubes, I'll be rebuilding it. I'll let you know in about 3 weeks.


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PostPosted: January 20, 2007, 9:46 am 
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Location: Corning NY
Jon you said that you were going to be using Koni shocks, where are you getting them from? I looked on like and could not find much, and even less that listed prices. I know that they are not goig to be cheap. I have ridden in my buddies Prelude that has the Same "setup" that i do and he is even running a higher spring rate and i think that it rides better. Than my KYB AGX shocks.



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ken

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PostPosted: January 20, 2007, 11:27 am 
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Ken,

I haven't completed my damper selection, but I found a nice 32 page catalog with prices on http://www.truechoicekoniracingservices.com/. It shows all the racing and street stuff and Eibach spring kits. Should be something in Phase 2 or 3 or Threaded Susp Kit that will work on our applications. Two-way adjustables may not fit in my budget.

I haven't found a preferred (read that as cheap) vendor yet. I'll try my local oval track shop first. They gave me the best prices on Wilwood stuff.

From my Miata experience, I don't think KYB is very close to Koni in performance and definitely not in longevity. One Koni will probably be cheaper than 2 KYBs.


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PostPosted: January 20, 2007, 11:59 am 
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Location: Charleston, WV
Koni adjustables are wonderful but they are expensive. The last I checked for a set of single adjustable coilovers with Eibach springs were around $1200 from Truechoice. Koni=$$$ My 97 Neon ACR came factory equipped with Koni adjustables and for goofs I called Koni NA to inquire about rebuilding/revalving them. Turns out it wasn't much cheaper than buying a new set from Tirerack. I think I'd assemble my own from one of the threaded body units sold by one of the circletrack suppliers (Afco, Cerrara etc.) before dropping $1200 on Konis.

But for a person who has the cash there are few better options than Koni.

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PostPosted: January 21, 2007, 8:27 pm 
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The damper decision is a few months away. I always considered about $800 for coilovers. Probably the 2nd highest cost of the four big systems/components: donor, brakes, wheels/tires, and coilovers. Brakes are coming in higher. Wheels and tire decision not finalized.

Fabbed the front susp subframe this weekend. It's narrow, and the lower wishbone tubes will be 620 mm long. I'll try to finish the front wishbones this week.

It was 20 degrees F this AM. Garage was 42 when I started. My too-small heaters got it up to 52 and it was bearable. I told my wife I wanted to finish the car before next winter.


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PostPosted: January 21, 2007, 10:04 pm 
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I would harm a person to get a garage like that. Very nice, even if a bit cold. :D

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PostPosted: January 21, 2007, 10:24 pm 
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I want that garage. Mine is about as big as the pictured part of yours, but full of so much more crap.....

EDIT: I just realized you live in PA. Will you be at Carlisle this year for the kit car nationals?


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PostPosted: January 21, 2007, 11:13 pm 
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Just a teaser photo of the garage. I waited many years for this garage. I built a 4-bay addition with 620 SF upstairs for woodshop for buck making and storage before I started the Locost 7. Put in 33 LF of wall cabinets and 18 lf of floor cabinets before I started the At-om. Cabinets homebuilt out of 1/2 plywood.

I'll put in another 8 ft of electric baseboard. If that doesn't do it, maybe a nat. gas heater. Window AC later.

I live 70 miles from Carlisle and usually go to the Kit Car show to steal ideas and take lots of photos. I met Steve Laurendine (CMC) up there a year before they went out of business. He had a chrome plated frame there that year.

I'm also 40 miles from Hershey where they have the mother-of-all auto flea markets. There's a lot of motor head stuff nearby.


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PostPosted: January 28, 2007, 9:20 pm 
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I'm just a few hours away from completing the front suspension (except for push rods/coilovers). It's probably the single biggest time consumer, for me anyway. I'm using adjustable upper wishbone frame brackets. They will slide up or down and rotate. This will give me adjustment for caster, camber, toe, and instantaneous center within the limit of my heim joints' threaded lengths and engagement requirements. The upper wishbones will be rigid (not swivel jointed).

I got sidetracked Friday when I added 8' of additional electric baseboard in the garage. Heats up faster. Also had to travel to New Jersey for family stuff on Sat.

Wilwood claimed to be assembling my order on Fri so I should see it this week. Then I can finish the uprights by welding on the brake ears.

Should finish upper wisbones this week since my brackets are finalized. Guess I need a full length table soon, so I can locate the frt and rear frames and stick them together with the main tubes .


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PostPosted: January 28, 2007, 10:09 pm 
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Looks good Jon. I was wondering why you mounted your suspension brackets with the bolt perpendicular to the ground rather than parallel like most other folks. Does it give you any better adjustablility or travel or something like that?

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PostPosted: January 28, 2007, 10:37 pm 
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chetcpo wrote:
Looks good Jon. I was wondering why you mounted your suspension brackets with the bolt perpendicular to the ground rather than parallel like most other folks. Does it give you any better adjustablility or travel or something like that?


It's stronger and in case of an accident, it tend to localize the damage to the arm and bracket rather than spreading it through the frame.

Note how the bolts through the eyes would shear.


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PostPosted: January 28, 2007, 10:56 pm 
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I thought about mounting mine sideways like that so I can have the pivoting upper control arm similar to what Jack McKormic (sp?) has on his website. My only concern was that I am not sure if they will wear out faster moving in that direction, but I don't think they will. The adjustable mount is definitely interesting, I can't say I've ever seen that before. What inspired you?


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PostPosted: January 28, 2007, 10:57 pm 
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chetcpo wrote:
Looks good Jon. I was wondering why you mounted your suspension brackets with the bolt perpendicular to the ground rather than parallel like most other folks. Does it give you any better adjustablility or travel or something like that?


It's my first post after lurking...

...but I'm going to guess that if he rotated the brackets 90 degrees from where the are now, welding the bracket to the clamp would have been more difficult (and weaker). He would have been welding on the "edge" of the bracket vs. in the bend.


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PostPosted: January 28, 2007, 11:00 pm 
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wokfu jones wrote:
chetcpo wrote:
Looks good Jon. I was wondering why you mounted your suspension brackets with the bolt perpendicular to the ground rather than parallel like most other folks. Does it give you any better adjustablility or travel or something like that?


It's my first post after lurking...

...but I'm going to guess that if he rotated the brackets 90 degrees from where the are now, welding the bracket to the clamp would have been more difficult (and weaker). He would have been welding on the "edge" of the bracket vs. in the bend.


Actually, welding along the frame member instead of across it is stronger. Just a guess, but Jon, those movable locating brackets are not going to end up being used. After you figure out their locations you will replace them with permenant brackets? Right?


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PostPosted: January 28, 2007, 11:03 pm 
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modernbeat wrote:
wokfu jones wrote:
chetcpo wrote:
Looks good Jon. I was wondering why you mounted your suspension brackets with the bolt perpendicular to the ground rather than parallel like most other folks. Does it give you any better adjustablility or travel or something like that?


It's my first post after lurking...

...but I'm going to guess that if he rotated the brackets 90 degrees from where the are now, welding the bracket to the clamp would have been more difficult (and weaker). He would have been welding on the "edge" of the bracket vs. in the bend.


Actually, welding along the frame member instead of across it is stronger. Just a guess, but Jon, those movable locating brackets are not going to end up being used. After you figure out their locations you will replace them with permenant brackets? Right?


Really?

Whatever you say.


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