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Learning how to build Lotus Seven replicas...together!
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PostPosted: December 24, 2019, 6:55 pm 
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Location: Boise, Idaho
You are right Perry. It's such simple item, but it makes a major transformation.


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PostPosted: December 27, 2019, 11:25 pm 
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A few more interior panels have been made. The dash base, face and cover have been fit, the right door has been gutted (from 60 to 25 pounds) and the heat shield panel foundation for the exhaust pipe/muffler has been roughed-in. The exhaust system will run down the right side of the car, between the cage and the door skin with ample heat shielding blanket materials ( and probably some ventilation of the door skin ). In the RHD Caterham, I sat right next to the muffler and the heat shielding made its location a non-issue in 20 minute track sessions.


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PostPosted: December 31, 2019, 3:23 pm 
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The rear panels have been cut/fit. The body panels were put on to check for fit. With the car at ride height, the air dam is right at ground level. Based on the proven experience with the Locost splitter at 1.5 inches and the longer overhang, this air dam will need to be trimmed up to 3 inches (there will be a splitter below it). But, it's looking like a race car now. :cheers:
Happy New Year


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PostPosted: December 31, 2019, 7:36 pm 
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Location: Cornelius OR
inspiring!

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PostPosted: January 5, 2020, 1:14 pm 
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Did some work on the drivetrain such that the engine and trans are now ready to stay in the car.
With the relocation of the drivetrain, the shift lever was uncomfortably back 5 inches from the steering wheel. The stock shift tower mount consists of 4 bolts in a rectangular layout. So, as I had done before with the Caterham, the shift rod and shifter housing were shortened 103mm. The remaining rear bolt holes on the casting were moved to the forward mounting lugs on the trans. The shift knob is now more conveniently beside the steering wheel.
The engine had been used previously with the dry sump pump only handling the scavenge. It was decided to go with a full 3-stage pump on this installation. So, the front cover was removed to extract the stock pump and associated OMP items.
It was also decided to just remove the center section of the cowel since it was not going to be an integral part of the firewall anymore. This task (and work on the doors and driver's seat) were accomplished by my son, who was visiting for the holidays. Thank you Justin. This will make working on the top of the engine much easier.


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PostPosted: January 9, 2020, 6:45 pm 
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seven13bt wrote:
Hi MV8,

The front spindles are Wilwood M2 clones at std height, but the long lower ball joint (Coleman 719 monoball) makes it effectively a drop spindle.


This also has the added benefit(?) of lengthening the distance between the ball joints, which will slow down camber change and probably helps with leverage (strength/deflection).
Was this selection on purpose? For this benefit? Or where there other influences?

I am also troubling over wheel clearance and how far the wheels can be steered before hitting the control ams and the closer the ball joints are to the wheel the worse this gets.

Are you using a rod end or an Econoline tie rod end for the upper ball joint?

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PostPosted: January 9, 2020, 10:51 pm 
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Hi BW,
The std spindle with the monoball lower stud was chosen to get the widest spacing between BJs (it's 10.25 inches) and get a higher upper A-arm mounting point on the chassis given the upper frame rail height of 17 inches.
The lower BJ is about 2 3/8 inches above the wheel and the lower A-arm isn't at risk of wheel contact with the amount of steering limit I may end up with. The length of the Wilwood steering arm (5"), the Speedway Motors bump steer stud and the 1/2" rod end attached to the 3/4" OD tie rod link that I made has me currently limiting the steering to just over one turn from center (it will go 1.25 turns). Adjustments to the steering arm and the bump steer stud are possible, but at the current imposed limit, the outer wheel is turned at 27 degrees. I'm expecting that this will be adequate, so I'll just be putting a 3/8 collar on the rack as a limiter. If more travel is needed, one possibility will be to shave some off of the bump steer stud to raise the rod end (and a spacer under the rack mount to raise it also). Another option will be to fab a shorter steering arm. The ability of the Wilwood upright to bolt on the steering arm was one of the features leading to its selection.
The upper BJ is a 5/8" rod end.


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PostPosted: January 16, 2020, 5:36 pm 
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The dry sump oil lines have been made. The oil cooler and dry sump tank have been roughly positioned but not tied down. The electric water pump is inplace. The wiring on the engine is mostly done and the intake manifold is installed. The throttle linkage has been completed. The pedal assembly/master cylinders are installed as well as the hard brake lines and clutch line. The clutch system has been bled.
The electrical system is mostly laid out and fastened down. The instrument panel is mostly assembled. Now for some wiring.


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PostPosted: January 16, 2020, 6:36 pm 
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Looks like the rack placement is promoting reverse Ackerman. May not be an issue in a track car. Just sayin'.

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PostPosted: January 16, 2020, 9:29 pm 
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Benny, your observation is correct. However, the amount is so small that it doesn't overwhelm the amount defined by the outer rod end relative to the spindle axis. When I measured the outboard wheel at 27 degrees , the inboard wheel was at 29 degrees.

Ron


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PostPosted: January 16, 2020, 9:50 pm 
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Glad that it's not an issue. Mine is much more than that and it is noticeable. But I have other problems in that area to correct.

Cheers

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PostPosted: January 21, 2020, 3:53 pm 
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I still need the crank position sensor and the datalogger components, but the majority of the dash wiring is done.


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PostPosted: January 21, 2020, 5:33 pm 
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Looks pretty neat. Going to be easy to maintain.

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PostPosted: January 22, 2020, 1:05 pm 
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Looks very neat & tidy. I've never seen a fuel/air mixture gauge before. Is it a measure done independently of your engine CPU? I.e., does it have its own independent sensor for measuring that ratio?

Cheers,

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Damn! That front slip angle is way too large and the Ackerman is just a muddle.

Build Log: viewtopic.php?f=35&t=5886


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PostPosted: January 22, 2020, 1:17 pm 
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Some widebands have the controller built into the gauge and some the gauge is a remote display.
Most non-OEM ECUs have the O2 controller as an external device.

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