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Learning how to build Lotus Seven replicas...together!
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PostPosted: December 13, 2007, 12:01 pm 
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chetcpo wrote:
Yessir Dave, that's just another piece of 1" tube welded onto the inside of the frame rail, with a hole drilled through it. (well actually, two holes)


Where did you get those bolt bushings chet? I will probably do the same for my build. Makes sense now that you guys talk about it that if the engine is mounted on rubber then the tranny needs to be also.

J. R.

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PostPosted: December 13, 2007, 12:16 pm 
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They came in the Pro-kit I bought for a Neon I used to own. My brother in law scavenged the rest of them, the kit came with 8 of them.

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PostPosted: December 13, 2007, 12:27 pm 
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Time then to start a search for some....

If someone else has luck finding some please post it.

J. R.

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PostPosted: December 13, 2007, 12:35 pm 
You can find all sorts of rubber and poly bushings at your local auto parts store, usually packaged in red with HELP! branding. It's not that critical what you use, it simply needs to be something that can deform a bit to let the transmission twist a few degrees. I think mine's just resting on a rubber washer from a hardware store actually.

You only need to use one of the vertical bolts because there just isn't much load. You don't have the diff horsing around at the other end of a PPF to deal with.

Here's mine.
Image


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PostPosted: December 13, 2007, 10:51 pm 
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Dang, I'm far from car and camera--I'll post a photo in 20 hours or so, but here's one that seems to work slick.

It's a Chrysler engine mount, NAPA/Balkamp part # 602-1170, cross references to M2265 with some brands...it's a rectangular rubber mount, 1-3/8" thick with a 1/2-13 threaded stud on each side and a 1/2" dimple on the bottom. To mount it to the trans, put the stud on the top side of the mount into the forward PPF mounting hole on the trans, put a 1/2" coupling nut (typically 1-3/4" long) on the stud but don't tighten it down, leave about a 1/8" gap between the bottom of the coupling nut and the transmission casting. Drop a 4-1/2" long 1/2-13 bolt (with steel washer) through the top of the transmission and into the top of the coup;ling nut, and tighten it up. The bottom of the mount bolts to a plate welded to the chassis; the plate needs two 1/2" holes in it, one for the stud and one for the dimple.

Sorry to make this into a story problem, I'll get some pix up tomorrow.

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PostPosted: December 14, 2007, 1:26 am 
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Location: Champion, Ohio
Another option: I still have a goodly amount of that conveyor belt material, probably enough for another 5-6 rubber strips. I'd have to dig around, but if you're using a Miata engine, I could just copy the ones I have for my engine. Because of the fiber in the middle, it's a bitch to cut an exact hole--it likes to expand when drilling and shrink when you're done, so getting the bolt through is a pain. They'd make great wipes for a suppressor...

Huh. I was digging around for a picture of my transmission mount, and I don't appear to have any. I'll have to take a picture; I did a significant modification of the bell housing mounting area as well--makes a easier to mount, and allows you to make a smaller transmission tunnel. I'll try to post a picture tomorrow.

Nate
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PostPosted: December 14, 2007, 2:07 am 
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JackMcCornack wrote:
Dang, I'm far from car and camera--I'll post a photo in 20 hours or so, but here's one that seems to work slick.

It's a Chrysler engine mount, NAPA/Balkamp part # 602-1170, cross references to M2265 with some brands...


Sounds good, Jack. Looking forward to the pictures.

FWIW, I couldn't find the part searching for those part numbers, but it will come up if you search for a motor mount for a 1976 DODGE D200 PICKUP - V8-318 5.2L at your favorite parts store. Oddly, those part numbers did come up once I found the part by vehicle...go figger.

For $3, I'll pick one up, even if I end up just bolting some big rubber washers in there. Here's the part on NAPA:

Image

http://www.napaonline.com/MasterPages/NOLMaster.aspx?PageId=470&LineCode=BK&PartNumber=6021170&Description=Motor+Mount+-+Front

Thanks, Jack.
-dave

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PostPosted: December 14, 2007, 3:35 pm 
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That's the one, Dave. Now I don't have to take a photo of it :-)

Here it is mounted. I use red LocTite on the bolt threads, so when I'm removing it in close quarters (after the trans tunnel goes in) the coupling nut unscrews from the mount stud rather than coming off the bolt, hanging on the mount, and being a nuisance..

Main reason I did it this way instead of a through bolt pinching flexible material top-and-bottom, was so it wouldn't need any rubber/urethane under the mount plate (or under the floor in some applications).

If you put a 1" hole in the top of the tunnel cladding, you can get a socket in there on a short extension, which makes pulling the trans much easier.

[edit/PS] You could use this part with a nut on it like Chet did with his damper (back on page 1 of this thread) but the casting isn't terribly flat or level in there and I didn't like how it loaded the stud kinda cockeyed. But as Keith mentions, it's not carrying much of a load anyway.


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TransMounted.jpg
TransMounted.jpg [ 35.99 KiB | Viewed 2489 times ]

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PostPosted: September 11, 2020, 6:30 pm 
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Wow to think I was original. I thought of this mount last night and decided to google something regarding rubber bushings and it turns out people have already done this ha

How has this type of mount held up for you guys?

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