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Learning how to build Lotus Seven replicas...together!
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PostPosted: July 23, 2010, 7:11 pm 
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Location: Montreal, Canada
Jawfish wrote:
Ewhen, your car in your you tube formula C video is that a Terrapin built as a F3/4 ? If so I need to know more about that car !!!
cheers
Fred


Yes , it is a formula built with Terrapin plans, which
we still have. I can not scan them, b'cause they are
two sheets 3x4 feet size. If you want copies of them
I could take photos section by section, or you can drop
by at my place and take a look at them, and decide if
they may be of any use for you. I'd be home all the weekend, and you are welcome at ;
2723 Pierre Bernard (It's corner house at Pierre de Coubertin and Pierre Bernard-- north-east side)
Eugene


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PostPosted: July 23, 2010, 8:32 pm 
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Wow A terrapin built in Canada,

I already have the plans, hope you don't mind but I'll post the pictures on the Terrapin Forum... My frame is built and stored away. Again I see that your table is very versatile :wink:

here a pic of my frame before I stored it away:
Image

I'd love to come by and see your Se7en Sunday... I'll drop you a PM.

Fred


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PostPosted: July 24, 2010, 6:49 pm 
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Location: The Woodlands, Tx
Don't forget the bottle opener....comes in handy!


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PostPosted: August 23, 2010, 12:30 am 
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Location: Montreal, Canada
Jawfish wrote:
Wow A terrapin built in Canada,

I already have the plans, hope you don't mind but I'll post the pictures on the Terrapin Forum...
Fred


Hi Fred
Herer few more pics of Terrapin with yours truly at the wheel, burnin' rubber.
Cheers
Eugene
BTW. Could you please give us address for the place with ae86 parts for sale, one of our 7-s could use another MAF and MR-2 intake manifold.
E.


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PostPosted: September 9, 2010, 4:50 pm 
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Location: Sunnyvale, CA
So, a few quick questions about making a table out of MDF and steel studs. Perhaps Hempy et al can chime in.I've fastened the perimeter studs already. I mounted them inside-out so I can clamp inside them from the outside, rather than drilling holes (as Hempy suggested). The table can still twist, because it's just the perimeter studs and the MDF.

  1. How much internal structure is necessary? And also, should the internal structure be all orthogonal, or should some diagonals be added, too.
  2. My perimeter studs are independent (each side is its own piece). Should I connect them together? And how?
  3. How do I connect studs together in general? Tape? Little brackets screwed together? Do I make flanges from the studs and fasten them to other studs that way?
  4. How does the plywood fasten to the studs? Do I only fasten it through the outer studs? Is it possible/advisable to attach the plywood to the internal stud structures?

Thanks for the help.


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PostPosted: September 9, 2010, 8:00 pm 
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Matt,

No diagonals are necessary, the MDF will keep it from scissoring. Two extra longitudinals would give you 16" spacing but I would go with 3 extra braces giving you 12" between brace centerlines.

I would overlap the corners and longitudinals and use broadhead self-drillers to fasten.

I would use self-drilling sheetrock screws to attach the MDF to the frame but I would pre-drill the MDF with a regular 1/8" drill bit and then use a recesser bit to make room for the screw head.

Tom

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PostPosted: September 9, 2010, 11:24 pm 
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Off Road SHO wrote:
Matt,

No diagonals are necessary, the MDF will keep it from scissoring. Two extra longitudinals would give you 16" spacing but I would go with 3 extra braces giving you 12" between brace centerlines.

I would overlap the corners and longitudinals and use broadhead self-drillers to fasten.

I would use self-drilling sheetrock screws to attach the MDF to the frame but I would pre-drill the MDF with a regular 1/8" drill bit and then use a recesser bit to make room for the screw head.

Tom
The basic design is pretty standard and you've got that, but I'd shy away from MDF if possible. For just a couple bucks more you can have a nice sheet of 5 ply plywood.

It won't crumble, especially at the edges and around holes. It deforms a lot less. It'll take grease and liquids better than MDF, which turns to mush or swell! And best of all, it's less prone to catching fire than MDF! MDF is simply sawdust, mixed with glue and pressed. That glue likes to burn when it gets warm.... like in welding warm. OSB is nearly as bad. Only plywood uses large sheets of wood which makes it a bit more robust.

I built mine like a regular house wall. 4 2x6 equally spaced and capped at the ends. 3 sets of offset stringers evenly spaced (so I could screw into each end). and 4x4 legs, lag bolted 2 directions in the corners.

It was capable enough that I sat myself (#275), the chassis (~#400) and the motor/trans assy (~#300) directly on the table with barely a hint of deflection (~1/4") and when I was done with it I simply Saws-all'd it down the middle length wise and used the halfs as benches in my garage as you saw.

Go for the plywood. You won't regret it especially if you do have to drill holes!

KS

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PostPosted: September 12, 2010, 12:10 am 
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I personally think MDF is better than ply. It is more structually stable than ply and uniform as well. As ply changes temp or moisture content is will twist or potato chip. Ply is also not as dimensionally accurate as MDF as far as thickness goes. You can mic a sheet of MDF and be withing a few .001" across the whole sheet, not so with ply. I had no problem with my MDF trying to catch fire. It is so dense that it blackes on the outside but doesn't burn unless your trying to light the edge. It will swell if you leave water/pop/beer on it but it has a slick serface and doesn't absorb liquid very fast. Particle board is NOT the same as MDF.

What ever you do, but a sheet on the bottom of your studs. Closing the box makes it MUCH stiffer.

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PostPosted: September 12, 2010, 3:57 pm 
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Awesome. The MDF started flat, and now it's going to stay flat.
I put in 3 more longitudinals in the middle (for 5 total). Then I did some staggered crosses. Nothing is tied together (I should've done that, but I didn't.

By the way, make sure you've got something soft underneath the MDF when it's vertical, so the edges don't tear when it shuffles itself around. Oh well, it's not in a critical spot.

The plywood was fastened around the perimeter, and then I set it on sawhorses today. It's within a degree of horizontal at any place and any orientation. I think I can take that discrepancy out with some appropriate shimming. I think it'll work just fine.


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PostPosted: April 10, 2011, 6:28 pm 
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Has anybody tried something like this? Looks like it should work well.

http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200466790_200466790

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PostPosted: April 10, 2011, 8:44 pm 
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Great for a makeshift worktop, but you will be relying on the trueness of your 2x4's. They will also be very prone to flexing/bending in the middle.

I have actually just been going down the route of playing with workbench/build table building. I wanted a new workbench in my workshop (actually a new top for a 6X3 folding bench that the previous owner left, I will add legs/shelf later). I decided to make it it 6ftx3ft. Originally I bought some 2x4 metal studs and, having not read this thread in enough detail, constructed them as you would in a wall. This lead to raised sections where the studs and headers met and I was quite dissapointed about how metal studs turned out.

Since reading these build table threads again, I realise how I should have been putting them together. I will have to try again and with 2x6 metal studs.

Anyways, I ended up building it with 2x6 wood studs and a 1/2" particle board top with hardboard topping that. It was hard to find 2x6's without much of a crown in them. I think this has to be the biggest problem in wooden studded worktops - the warping of the studs.

Anyway, i'm happy with my overbuilt worktop that I can hardly lift - i'll probably frame out my build table on top of it when I get round to it :)


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PostPosted: January 4, 2012, 6:36 pm 
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Hi Chetcpo !
The reason we use 0.90 thou. instead of 0.62 thou.
(16 ga.) is our bad experience from twisty road racing.
The rack'nd pinion was ripping off the 16 ga. tubing.
around front bulkhead, there was metal fatigue
visible in other areas. I'd rather carry 20, 25 Lbs.
more on the frame, and use lighter material for
the rest of the project, like 0.40 thou aluminum
for body work and fenders , plus drilling non-critical
parts.

Here in Montreal "Duro" (company) cuts glass for
your windshield frame, makes rag tops etc.
Being "Low-cost" oriented i forced my dear wife
to sow the rag top on the car in picture.

Apparently McSorley never built any car, and Ron Champion could not be taken seriously with his 250 $. So we've been using (free) original Lotus Seven frame design, with little extra improvement in triangulation and front-rear bulkheads to accept geometry of the donor car. In other words, we try to build frame around existing and proven suspension, instead of reverse, and playing with unknown.
As for me being "expert" You must be kidding :-))))
Greets ! And thanks for your letter.
Eugene
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=znw459mv ... re=related[/quote]


Hi Eugene I have another question regarding tubing size. I would like to use your experince with building these cars and like you reasoning for using thicker walled tube. The problem I am having is that in my area my 2 choices for tubing is either 16ga or .100". Do you see any problem with using the .100" wall stuff or would I be better off going to the 16ga? I am just concered that .100" might be going a bit to heavy but maybe heavyer is better that to light.


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PostPosted: January 12, 2012, 4:52 am 
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https://www.facebook.com/SavannahGoGo?sk=photos

that's my build log on Facebook. feel free to add.. so far i have the outer frame finished took a total of 3 days. built the table, and the frame. next is suspension mount pointe etc. etc.

Mod so far was to add castors, made my table a little tall, but was perfect for doing the tack for the upper part of my frame. Getting to the other side is no issue at all since.. I can spin the whole thing with one hand. i keep my mig under the table, and have a full electrical hookup for tooling in the table..

THE BOTTLE OPENER is the MOST important MOD. need to have somethign to pop them beer bottle tops! magic hat #9 all part of my build.

I also broadcast the build on tuesday's / Thursdays on www.tinychat.com/makako33

feel free to chime in.


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PostPosted: May 11, 2015, 1:28 pm 
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I always thought that this was a great thread. I was just wondering if any of you guys have come up with any new, and terribly clever ideas in the interim?

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PostPosted: May 18, 2015, 6:30 pm 
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Location: Buffalo, NY/Williamsport, PA
This is what I came up with this winter. I wanted a table that was easy to get the car up on without an engine hoist or fork lift. The arms pivot in the middle to adjust for width but more importantly allows you to jack up one end and then roll the table under and then you can jack the other end up kick the second set of legs underneath and then slide the second 2x4 underneath. It is adjustable in height from 16 in. to 28 in. And the legs can fold together for storage. The front legs are longer so you can get the engine and transmission in and out.

Image

Image

Image

Image


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