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Learning how to build Lotus Seven replicas...together!
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PostPosted: January 17, 2016, 11:42 pm 
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That is totally cool! Oh, sorry for the slow acknowledgement. :roll:

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PostPosted: January 18, 2016, 9:56 pm 
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Alright, this is what I have planned. 11'x4', 3/4" plywood top. There will be plywood on the lower braces for storage. 7 1/2" clearance under lower braces for engine hoist clearance. Threaded feet on legs for level/height adjustment have enough travel to fully retract and and bring mounted casters (not illustrated) into use.


Attachments:
buildtable2ACapture.PNG
buildtable2ACapture.PNG [ 186.55 KiB | Viewed 2516 times ]

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PostPosted: January 19, 2016, 11:32 am 
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Location: Carlsbad, California, USA
I took the same, longer build table approach and have been very happy with it.
Attachment:
File comment: Oversized build table
Build-Table-Graphic.jpg
Build-Table-Graphic.jpg [ 63.98 KiB | Viewed 2497 times ]


You've done two very smart things: 1) make sure your shop crane fits under the table; and 2) left a little overhang of the plywood around the table. I can't tell you how many times the latter paid off. You're always needing to clamp or fasten something to the table and that overhang will get a work out.

I liked having the whole chassis (minus the kick-up in my case) fit on the table. I think it gave me an easier working situation and more accuracy in the chassis as I could lay out everything at once. The one thing to watch for is welding distortion when you build the table. When I build my table, I wasn't very experienced with welding and didn't know how to control distortion well. I ended up shimming the plywood top to get it really flat because of that. Treat the table just like it is the chassis (welding carefully to balance distortion) and it will pay off.

Cheers,

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Damn! That front slip angle is way too large and the Ackerman is just a muddle.

Build Log: viewtopic.php?f=35&t=5886


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PostPosted: January 19, 2016, 5:46 pm 
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Thanks, Lonnie. Another idea I had for that overhang was to put several electrical outlet boxes under there around the four sides. These boxes would be fed by a single cord, so I could have two, or three power tools in use on the table but only one cord leading to the table to trip over... or not, if I dropped the power from an overhead reel!

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PostPosted: January 19, 2016, 7:39 pm 
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ngpmike wrote:
Thanks, Lonnie. Another idea I had for that overhang was to put several electrical outlet boxes under there around the four sides. These boxes would be fed by a single cord, so I could have two, or three power tools in use on the table but only one cord leading to the table to trip over... or not, if I dropped the power from an overhead reel!



Good idea but recess the outlets (I'd use power strips) so you can still use the outside edge.

Tom

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PostPosted: January 19, 2016, 7:50 pm 
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This is just an old mans ramblings. Would it not be a good idea at the design stage of these tables to have the total area under the engine/trans removable? Just thinking it would be handy if this strip could be lifted out to facilitate the engine and box so the mounts could also be done whilst on the table. There could then be a lot more done prior to removing the chassis from the table as other brackets could also be worked out. Just thoughts

Bob

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PostPosted: January 19, 2016, 8:33 pm 
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Good ideas from both of you guys. Maybe some future builder can use them.

Off Road SHO; My outlets will be set back 2" from the edge on the frame rail. I have a 2" margin all the way around. Power strips are a great idea, but I just finished a remodel job so I have several outlets and boxes as surplus from that.

Bob; interesting idea! Once the frame structure is finish welded, I may just strip off the ply, and rest the car frame on the bare table frame for doing brackets (Sorry Gonzo, there's that word), mounts, etc. I visited a local shop that does street rod frames, and their frame tables are just pipe frames with clamp-on bracing stations wherever needed.

Keep the ideas coming guys! :cheers:

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PostPosted: January 19, 2016, 9:19 pm 
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bob wrote:
This is just an old mans ramblings. Would it not be a good idea at the design stage of these tables to have the total area under the engine/trans removable? Just thinking it would be handy if this strip could be lifted out to facilitate the engine and box so the mounts could also be done whilst on the table. There could then be a lot more done prior to removing the chassis from the table as other brackets could also be worked out. Just thoughts

Bob


Good thoughts though, Bob, 'cause I done did it! :mrgreen:

When I designed the table. I put 2"x2"x1/8" angle iron running fore and aft, taking the loads from the engine mounts directly along with the bottom rails of the transmission structure. I made a wooden mock-up of my chassis previously, and used measurements from it to place the spacing's of the joists to be right under the cross members. So, both the enfine mounts and th transmission mounts are supported under the plywood with metal structure. Additionally, the whole rear-most area can be cut away to the inside face of the outside frame rails, allowing the live axle with Panhard rod and mounts to be placed on the build table too. I haven't cut that section out yet in the table, but it's an option if I want to do it.

Here are some shots of it in various stages:
Attachment:
File comment: 3D model
Build-Table-0.jpg
Build-Table-0.jpg [ 89.48 KiB | Viewed 2438 times ]


Finished table minus plywood top.
Attachment:
File comment: Welded and painted, but without ply. This is looking from the rear axle end, but you can see the angle iron up forward.
Build-Table-1.jpg
Build-Table-1.jpg [ 79.63 KiB | Viewed 2438 times ]


Cut-out for engine and transmission. You can see an outline of the chassis tubes from the grey overspray on the white top. By the way, painting it white and sealing it will keep it fresh from moisture, oil, solvents, etc. and permit clear markings of lines, dimensions, etc.
Attachment:
File comment: General view of engine/trans cutout
Build-Table 3.JPG
Build-Table 3.JPG [ 143.39 KiB | Viewed 2438 times ]

Attachment:
File comment: Close-up where you can see the angle iron peeking out and a good outline of the chassis tubes.
Build-Table 2.JPG
Build-Table 2.JPG [ 136.9 KiB | Viewed 2438 times ]


Cheers,

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Damn! That front slip angle is way too large and the Ackerman is just a muddle.

Build Log: viewtopic.php?f=35&t=5886


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PostPosted: January 19, 2016, 9:56 pm 
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Lonnie, what are those 'pads' at the end of your table legs called? What do I ask for at Lowes?

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PostPosted: January 20, 2016, 1:40 am 
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I think they call them scaffold feet or leveling jacks, of course i could be way off.


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PostPosted: January 20, 2016, 10:09 am 
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ngpmike wrote:
Lonnie, what are those 'pads' at the end of your table legs called? What do I ask for at Lowes?


I don't think you'll find the ones I used at Lowes, Mike. They are called leveling feet. I ordered them online from McMaster-Carr. They work with threaded inserts like these ==> http://www.mcmaster.com/#leveling-feet/=10ri6rm to give you a nice, adjustable pad for the legs. My garage has about a 2 degree slope by design as most do for drainage. These feet let you get the build table level and will carry a heavy load.

It took me a little while of poking around on the McMaster site to find the right feet for the job. Most off the smaller ones (they carry heavy stuff for machinery too) don't have the capacity to support the weight of the build table and full Locost (chassis, trans, rear axle, suspension, etc.) and fit the above inserts. They are there, however. You just have to look.

I'll be gone almost all day today, but I can try to find my receipt with the part numbers, or re-locate them online tonight. The stuff that Lowe's or Home Depot or you local hardware store have will typically support 100-200 lb. maximum and are mostly for appliances and light loads. Let me know.

Cheers,

Lonnie

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Damn! That front slip angle is way too large and the Ackerman is just a muddle.

Build Log: viewtopic.php?f=35&t=5886


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PostPosted: January 20, 2016, 11:35 am 
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I used large 1" bolts and nuts for the leveling feet on my 1800 pound table. I welded 3" diameter washers to the bolt heads to keep the PSI down. You'd be amazed at what the lettering on a bolt head will do to concrete when you put a lot of force behind it. I use a pallet jack to move my table arround the shop. In fact everything large in my shop is easily movable either by its own wheels or by pallet jack.

Tom

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Sometimes, I'm as confused as a baby in a topless bar.

My short term memory is absolutely horrible and so is my short term memory.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sG16m2e4O6I


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PostPosted: January 20, 2016, 5:14 pm 
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So far, my plan is to weld 5/8-11 square nuts (perfect fit for 1x1 tubing) to the bottom of the table legs. Then make my extensions from 5/8-11 allthread, then weld some pads to the bottom, or just screw and pin some flat top cap nuts on for the feet.

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PostPosted: May 31, 2017, 10:16 pm 
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Bumping this one as well!

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PostPosted: September 28, 2017, 1:52 am 
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I have built three Build tables in Solidworks, I wonder which you guys would recommend.

The first one is two adjustable height tables that might be an overkill. It's two independent tables that can be joined together or aligned and spaced apart. The tops are a clone of the Paulk Workbench.
Attachment:
File comment: Table 1
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File comment: Table 1
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A1F3y41Tn9A
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Edsal-33-in- ... /204417822

The second is a slight copy of Paulk Workbench just one big table I think the storage space under the table would be really helpful, but I would like your thoughts?
Attachment:
File comment: Table 2
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File comment: Table 2
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The last one is just a boring Table that has no height adjustment like the other two but would get the job done and cost a bunch less.
Attachment:
File comment: Table 3 with Frame as reference
Table_3_with_Frame.png
Table_3_with_Frame.png [ 531.01 KiB | Viewed 1642 times ]

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File comment: Table 3
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File comment: Table 3
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2017-09-27_2206_001.png [ 616.06 KiB | Viewed 1642 times ]


All three are a little bigger than most work tables 10" x 4' 4"


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