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 Post subject: Re: Roll pin strength
PostPosted: January 28, 2018, 7:47 am 
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Joined: February 28, 2009, 11:09 pm
Posts: 1288
Location: Connersville, Indiana
My final solution was to use Permatex sleeve retaining compound (3000 lb shear strength), followed by cross drilling, reaming the holes .001" undersize and installing 3/16" socket head screws, which had to be hammered home. Nuts are locktited in place.

Everybody needs a set of over/under reamers.

Bill


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 Post subject: Re: Roll pin strength
PostPosted: January 29, 2018, 2:59 am 
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Joined: August 27, 2005, 1:04 am
Posts: 1348
Location: Kamloops, BC, Canada
I know that welding on steering parts is frowned on, but I welded mine anyway. I figured it was pretty minor compared to some of the other structural welding I did on the car. I mentioned it to the structural integrity inspector when he looked at my car, and he said he didn't see any problems, but told me not to mention it to the official inspector because they wouldn't like it. I bought a splined shaft and turned it into a couple stubs that I welded into my tubing.
Kristian

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 Post subject: Re: Roll pin strength
PostPosted: February 7, 2018, 4:44 pm 
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Joined: February 8, 2014, 10:47 pm
Posts: 492
Location: Cornholio OR "Where the magic happens"
BBlue wrote:
Bent Wrench wrote:
Even Karts have splined connections.

Unless the bolts are pressed in there will potentially be slop.

That takes us back to roll pins. :)

If slop is the issue, how about using a sleeve retaining material in association with bolts? Is the problem with not using splines or double D fittings failure due to component failure, or failure due to improper assembly or parts substitution? Today, the proper solution seems to be tied to TIG welding. What was used prior to this technology?

Bill


Roll pins are squishy and will eventually develop slop (and crack) or shear.
Any kind of decent welding is fine and much safer for a slop free joining.
A fillet weld plus a couple of plug welds are going to be very hard to break, even gas brazed would be better than a pin or a through bolt(s).

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